HR Pod: Freelance Photographer Joe Hale on Running Photography, Tinman Elite, Temporary Move to Eugene

Photo by Kevin Gunawan.

HOORAY RUN PODCAST RETURNS! Episode 31. Freelance photographer Joe Hale joins host James Rogers in conversation for this comeback episode. Joe is known best for his running photography, and his client list includes Nike, Adidas and Tracksmith — to name a few. Joe graduates from Manhattan College this week and moves temporarily to Oregon later this month to shoot big-time track and field events from late May to late July. Joe talks about his time with Tinman Elite, upcoming travels to Eugene and the best running performances he’s seen in person.

This episode is sponsored by Sportwatch. Sportwatch is a team management app built by former athletes for track and cross-country coaches. View team performance, track athlete growth and much more all from the convenience of your phone. Ditch the clipboard and pick up Sportwatch! Learn more at sportwatch.us.

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Homer Spit Trail

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Photo by Charlotte Pope

How about a run down Homer Spit Trail in Homer, Alaska? Arctic lupine looking fantastic on the Homer Spit, cheering you along the way on this piece of the Kenai Peninsula. The Homer Spit stretches nearly five miles into Kachemak Bay.

Emelie Forsberg’s 2018 Kungsleden Trail FKT Attempt

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Photo by Philip Reiter

Emelie Forsberg on Day 2 of her 2018 Kungsleden Trail FKT (Fastest Known Time) attempt. Forsberg set the FKT in 4 days, 21 hours. Read this Hooray Run post for more on the journey. I’m posting this photo in light of the Salomon TV film released last week chronicling Forsberg’s historic feat. Watch the tremendous film below:

Thanks again to Laura Font of Lymbus for allowing Hooray Run to share this historic FKT attempt in writing and in photos.

Top 7 American Marathon Performances from 2017 WMM Races

Embed from Getty Images

Amy Cragg poses after finishing third in the marathon at the 2017 IAAF World Championships in London.


If, at the start of 2017, you wished for American marathoners to deliver historic, unforgettable, tear-inducing runs on World Marathon Majors stages throughout the year, then 1) your wish-granted rate ballooned and 2) you should get paid to give wishing advice.

Who woulda thought? An article toward the end of the year ranking several noteworthy American marathon performances from major 26.2-mile races—from the same 365-day span.

TIMEOUT: Wait, what are the World Marathon Majors? Apologies for any confusion caused by “WMM” in the headline. I’ll proceed to give the abbreviated explanation of the WMM: A series of six of the best, most competitive marathons in the world (Tokyo, Boston, London, Berlin, Chicago, New York City) scores points to determine a male and female winner of each cycle, with the winner snatching $500,000. NOTE: Olympics and IAAF World Championships have a say, too. For example, this year, the London World Championships marathon counted as a WMM race.

Point allocation for each race:

  • 1st place — 25 points
  • 2nd place — 16 points
  • 3rd place — 9 points
  • 4th place — 4 points
  • 5th place — 1 point

We are in Series XI (they officially use Roman numerals) of the WMM, which consists of the following eight races:

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WorldMarathonMajors.com

The current WMM series flows into 2018, but for the sake of this article and the following rankings, I’m scratching series, cycles—whatever you wanna call them—and choosing from solely 2017 WMM-labeled races. I picked the top seven from these 2017 races: Tokyo, Boston, London, IAAF World Championships, Berlin, Chicago, New York City.

TIME IN: Still with me? Good stuff ahead. The depth of American marathoning success made this an unenviable ranking task. As a fan of USA distance running, you should be exuberant about that, almost bewildered.

Arguably the best year ever for American marathoners? As Shalane Flanagan would say, “F–k yes!”


7. Laura Thweatt, London Marathon, April 23

Laura Thweatt finished more than eight minutes behind the leader, but the top two women at London—Mary Keitany and Tirunesh Dibaba, respectively—went sub-2:18 (!), with Keitany setting the women’s-only world record (2:17:01). There was plenty of noise at the front, but Thweatt’s 2:25:38 sixth-place finish didn’t wash away in silence.

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